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The woman in black differences between film and book

So: what did I learn? Apart from the fact that I now need a course of counselling. The core story the film takes some liberties with other details and completely refashions the ending follows young solicitor Arthur Kipps as he travels to the remote Eel Marsh House to sift through the documents of late client Alice Drablow. The woman in black puts in some heart-stopping appearances herself frankly, the black-clad usher materialising silently at my elbow at one point scared the wits out of me. And the sound effects are guaranteed to have the audience screaming. I admit, the price of a ticket these days can be as terrifying as a malevolent spirit.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Woman In Black 2: Angel of Death - Official US Trailer

The Woman in Black Analysis

This led to an interesting comparison of film versus book, particularly with regard to the finale. The sinister atmosphere drips off the page in a singular way that somehow demands to be taken completely seriously. By contrast the film inevitably lacks the subtlety of the book, piling on jump scares and extra deaths that were merely referred to in passing in the text.

That said, despite the miscasting of Daniel Radcliffe, the film is efficiently chilling, atmospheric and macabre as the curse of the woman in black unleashes havoc. The film reveals this curse very early on, whereas in the novel it is only discovered in the closing stages. Therefore, having Kipps die attempting to save his son from the oncoming train which his son has stood in front of due to a trance induced by the vengeful ghost leads to the scene with them all happily reunited in the afterlife.

This undercuts the horror considerably. There is no reunion in the afterlife, and instead, due to the flashback structure of the story, the reader already knows that he has spent decades recovering from this anguish. To an extent, I can understand why the filmmakers altered the ending, since if shot exactly as it is on page, the scene would not have been as powerful.

A film cannot get inside the head of the main character in quite the same way, and it would have been difficult to convey the full impact of the ensuing decades of grief. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account.

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The Woman in Black: comparing the film, the book and the play

First off I need to start my review by giving all my love to Daniel Radcliffe , he was utterly fantastic in the film! Go DanRad! The Woman In Black is about a young solicitor named Arthur Kipps who is sent to Crythin Gifford by the firm he works for to represent them at their former client, Mrs. Once the funeral is over he has to report to Mrs. The house, Eel March House, is a creepy house situated on a very secluded island.

This led to an interesting comparison of film versus book, particularly with regard to the finale. The sinister atmosphere drips off the page in a singular way that somehow demands to be taken completely seriously. By contrast the film inevitably lacks the subtlety of the book, piling on jump scares and extra deaths that were merely referred to in passing in the text.

It occured to me that in my last post my mind was more focussed upon comparisons between the Hammer film and the tv adaptation. But how does the new movie adaptation differ from the book? Well, the book begins with Arthur Kipps enjoying Christmas Eve with his family. The talk turns to ghost stories and Arthur becomes uncharacteristically taciturn and walks out of the house.

The Woman in Black: Play vs. Movie

In settling her affairs, he slowly unravels the mystery surrounding her decrepit manor house and first sees the woman in black, who has been haunting the town for years. The legend has it that every time someone sees the woman in black, a child dies tragically. The Woman in Black: Play vs. In it, Kipps is a widower raising a four-year old son. Inexplicably, his son is going to arrive in the village in four days to be reunited with him. Whilst this does add to the urgency of the situation, it then encourages a further dubious subplot in which Kipps concocts a plan to appease the woman in black in the hopes she will never return. The film also ups the morbidity considerably, with children getting bumped off left right, and centre we get treated three little girls jumping out of a window in the first five minutes alone. Both are highly accomplished and do a great job alternating between narration and living in the moment of the story. Kipps is particularly impressive, ably switching in and out of multiple roles.

The Woman in Black by Susan Hill

Aug 03, PM. I saw the movie and the ending was pretty good. Creepy and stuff. But the problem is I can't figure out what The lady in Blacks true intentions were?

The Woman in Black is a horror novel by Susan Hill , written in the style of a traditional Gothic novel. The plot concerns a mysterious spectre that haunts a small English town.

Without it, readers run the risk of being un-traumatized by this post and what is the fun in that, I ask you?! My favorite horror movie changes daily according to mood. I'm a huge horror fan but most of the movies are disappointing of late. For the most part I thought they worked and love Courtney's post!

The Woman in Black ~ differences between the book and film

T his is a ghost story, so we start with the storyteller. Literary critics rarely use this last term, preferring to talk of the "narrator". But when it comes to hauntings this traditional description is fitting.

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. This is one uptight narrator. Arthur can't even say that bad weather makes him depressed without mincing around, we suspect with his nose in the air:. My spirits have for many years now been excessively affected by the ways of the weather, and I confess that, had it not been for the air of cheerfulness and bustle that prevailed in the rest of the house, I should have been quite cast down in gloom and lethargy 1. Throughout the whole book, Arthur talks in his very British way about everything, avoiding the fact that he's going through some really rough stuff.

Book vs. Movie: THE WOMAN IN BLACK

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Feb 3, - This is a ghost story, so we start with the storyteller. Literary critics rarely use this last term, preferring to talk of the "narrator". But when it comes.

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Comments: 5
  1. Kajikinos

    It really surprises.

  2. Aralar

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  3. Grogami

    It seems to me, you were mistaken

  4. Gardakinos

    I confirm. I agree with told all above. Let's discuss this question.

  5. Grozshura

    In my opinion it is not logical

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